Mormon LDS Addiction Recovery Program (ARP)

The Addiction Recovery Program (ARP) in the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints is a comprehensive program designed to help individuals who struggle with addiction overcome their dependency on substances and lead healthy, productive lives.

Addiction Recovery Support in the Mormon Church

The LDS Addiction Recovery Program (ARP) is designed to help individuals who struggle with addiction to substances such as alcohol, drugs, and other substances. It is also intended to help individuals struggling with other types of addiction, such as gambling, shopping, or other behaviors.

The program is based on the principles of the gospel of Jesus Christ and is open to members of the church and non-members seeking help with addictions, including:

What is the LDS Addiction Recovery Program?

The ARP is a voluntary program that offers a structured and supportive environment for individuals in recovery.

It provides a range of resources and services, including support groups, counseling, and education on the principles of the gospel. The program also offers resources for family members and loved ones who are affected by the addiction of a loved one.

One of the key principles of the ARP is that individuals who struggle with addiction are not alone. The program offers a supportive community of individuals in recovery and trained leaders available to provide guidance and support. This community aspect of the program is crucial in helping individuals maintain their recovery and avoid relapse.

The ARP also focuses on helping individuals develop healthy coping skills and strategies to deal with the challenges and triggers that can lead to addiction. This can include learning new ways to manage stress, developing healthy relationships, and finding healthy outlets for emotions. The program also encourages individuals to develop a strong relationship with God and to incorporate prayer and scripture study into their daily routines.

The ARP is an ongoing program that provides support and resources for individuals throughout their recovery journey. The program is designed to be flexible and adaptable, with different levels of support and services based on the individual’s needs.

Overall, the Addiction Recovery Program in the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints is a valuable resource for individuals struggling with addiction. The program’s focus on community support, healthy coping skills, and reliance on the principles of the LDS  gospel make it an effective tool for helping individuals overcome addiction and lead healthy, productive lives.

Recovery Support Groups for Mormons and Non-Mormons

An LDS Recovery Support Group is a support group for individuals who are members of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints seeking addiction help. The group is based on the principles of the gospel of Jesus Christ and offers a supportive environment for individuals in recovery. The group may include trained leaders who provide guidance and support, as well as other individuals who are also in recovery. The group may also incorporate prayer, scripture study, and other activities based on the gospel principles to help individuals maintain their recovery and avoid relapse.

Recovery Support Group notes from the official website:

  • All participants are encouraged to introduce themselves by their first name only to help protect anonymity.
  • General recovery meetings are held for men and women combined, men only, or women only. Pornography use recovery meetings are held for men only or women only.
  • You can choose to listen only if you don’t feel comfortable participating or sharing. If you prefer only to listen, simply say “pass” when it is your turn to read or speak. You are welcome to participate to whatever extent you feel comfortable.
  • Recovery Support Groups follow the rule of Alcoholics Anonymous: “Who you see here, what you hear here, when you leave here, let it stay here.”

Summary

The ARP is a compassionate program open to members and non-members struggling with addiction. The structured environment provides individualized resources, such as counseling and support groups tailored for those recovering from substance abuse or the loved ones affected by it. Education on the principles of Jesus Christ’s gospel further equips individuals to lead meaningful lives free from dependency while providing much-needed support alongside family, friends, and church leaders throughout their journey toward recovery.

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Chris Carberg is the Founder of Addiction GuideReviewed by:Chris Carberg

AddictionHelp.com Founder & Mental Health Advocate

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Chris Carberg is a visionary digital entrepreneur, the founder of AddictionHelp.com, and a long-time recovering addict from prescription opioids, sedatives, and alcohol.  Over the past 15 years, Chris has worked as a tireless advocate for addicts and their loved ones while becoming a sought-after digital entrepreneur. Chris is a storyteller and aims to share his story with others in the hopes of helping them achieve their own recovery.

Jessica Miller is the Content Manager of Addiction GuideWritten by:

Content Manager

Jessica Miller is a USF graduate with a Bachelor’s Degree in English. She has written professionally for over a decade, from HR scripts and employee training to business marketing and company branding. In addition to writing, Jessica spent time in the healthcare sector (HR) and as a high school teacher. She has personally experienced the pitfalls of addiction and is delighted to bring her knowledge and writing skills together to support our mission. Jessica lives in St. Petersburg, FL with her husband and two dogs.

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